Sponsor This PageClick here to find out how

New Generation of Blood Clot Removal Devices

Specialists at Stony Brook Medicine’s Cerebrovascular and Stroke Center (CVC) are treating patients with a new generation of blood clot removal devices that show promise for stroke patients, including those with large vessel blockages. The Solitaire Flow Restoration Device and the Trevo device, approved by Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2012 to treat stroke caused by the sudden obstruction of a brain blood vessel (acute ischemic stroke) showed improved results over a previous standard and first generation clot-removal device in clinical trials.

“We have had excellent outcomes using these new devices,” said David Fiorella, M.D., Ph.D., a Professor of Clinical Neurological Surgery and Radiology at Stony Brook University School of Medicine and Co-Director of the CVC.

“In acute ischemic stroke, ‘time is brain,’ and in some cases just minutes matter. Therefore, restoring blood flow in an effective and timely manner is critical to the survival and recovery of stroke patients. These new devices enable us to quickly restore blood flow and retrieve the clot in most patients,” said Dr. Fiorella, who has performed some 30 procedures on stroke patients using the new devices.

Dr. Fiorella said that while intravenous clot-busting drugs remain a standard part of stroke therapy, endovascular therapies using the new devices are particularly beneficial when treating certain stroke patients.

“In many of the more severe stroke cases where the main arteries of the brain are blocked, intravenous medications are predictably ineffective, failing to open the occluded artery in 70 to 90 percent of the cases. Also, many patients are not eligible for intravenous clot busting medication because of their time of presentation, existing medical conditions, recent surgery, or the medications they take, such as blood thinners,” he explained. “In these cases where intravenous medications are ineffective or contraindicated, endovascular treatments using these new devices offer patients the most promise.”

By: Stony Brook University Cerebrovascular and Stroke Center , http://stonybrookmedicine.edu/newsroom/fiorellawoo

^ back to top

"In these cases where intravenous medications are ineffective or contraindicated, endovascular treatments using these new devices offer patients the most promise."
Encore Box Ad UE Ranger Your Ad Here