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Hiring A Caregiver: Tip of the Week

Is it time to hire a caregiver to help with your stroke survivor?

That is a tough question faced by many families of stroke survivors. Whether you or someone else is the primary caregiver, help may be needed from time to time.  This realization is not as sign of failure. It means you have enough sense to recognize that some tasks may have become more than one person can do effectively or without putting both of you at risk of injury.

When your loved ones start struggling with everyday tasks, hiring a home care aide can help them remain in their home -- and take some pressure off you and the rest of the family. Finding the right caregiver is critical, here is a great interview tip from The Caring Space.

“One of the many indicators of a quality caregiver is one’s ability to ask questions in order to get a better understanding of the situation. If you are doing a phone or in-person interview with a potential caregiver, think about how important is for this potential caregiver to get to the bottom of what your family’s situation is…they need to know exactly what is going on in your life so that they can formulate an approach to meeting your needs. If they simply let you explain your situation and what you are struggling with and their reply is “how much am I going to get paid” or even silence on the other end. How many small facets about your dilemma are they missing and do they even care what they are?

So look for which questions are being asked of you about the position and also look for little statements of compassion. When my Mom (who meant the world to me) needed care, I would often tell potential caregivers what my family was dealing with, how hard it was for me personally. If someone could hear about their potential boss’ personal pain and not respond with the utmost compassion, how could I hire them for a position caring for my Mom.

I wanted to see how in tune this individual was with identifying/sympathizing with me.

If someone hears you explain that your parent has been in and out of rehabilitation centers at nursing homes, hospitals, etc. and that they have a long list of chronic health conditions and still says nothing, not even an "I'm so sorry to hear that" then pass them up and interview the next candidate. There are a lot of caregivers who would love to work with you and you need to be picky. Look for the little things during interviews.”

By: Stroke-Network.com Amy McCraken, Courtesy of The Caring Space.

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"If someone hears you explain that your parent has been in and out of rehabilitation centers at nursing homes, hospitals, etc. and that they have a long list of chronic health conditions and still says nothing, not even an "I'm so sorry to hear that" then pass them up and interview the next candidate. "
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