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Community Classes that Improve Balance for Stroke Survivors

For stroke survivors facing issues with balance, there are opportunities available in your community to help you feel good on your own two feet. Call up your community recreation center, local YMCA, or gym of choice to see if they offer either of the following two courses. They might even offer special programs for seniors or individuals with more severe disabilities.

Water Aerobics

Hydrotherapy is proven to be particularly effective for individuals recovering from a stroke. The pool provides a safe place where you can work on your balance without worrying about taking a nasty fall.

For stroke survivors in their early stages of physical rehabilitation try holding onto the sides of a pool and practice balancing independently. Stabilizing your body against the moving water helps strengthen core muscles and retrains your body to balance itself. Make sure you’re comfortable balancing independently before enrolling in a class.

Tai Chi

Tai Chi is a specific type of Chinese martial arts known for its grace and fluidity. It is a noncompetitive form of exercise that relies on focused, strong movements and flexibility. Some describe Tai Chi as, “moving meditation.”

Many health benefits have been associated with Tai Chi. It is proven to reduce the risk of falls in elderly persons and pain in persons with fibromyalgia. Studies have also proven Tai Chi improves balance and coordination in stroke survivors.

Taking a Tai Chi class at your local fitness studio is a fabulous option for individuals who consider themselves advanced in their physical recovery. Often times these studios provide a wonderful setting to meet and mingle with like minded members of your community, who will encourage you along your road to recovery.

By: Kayleen Cohen, Stroke-Network.com

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"Studios provide a wonderful setting to meet and mingle with like minded members of your community, who will encourage you along your road to recovery."

Avoiding Falls in Public

An independent female stroke survivor was recently discussing the hazards of falling in public with her support group. She was nervous when she went out to run errands that she would slip and injure herself.

To avoid this, she made herself a “Precaution List,” which included rules to reduce her risk of falling. Her list included things like no walking on ice, always hold the hand rail on stairs, and avoid stepping over rugs.

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